Defeating Depression

She faces the fight against depression

Depression is a real illness. Yes. Photo via Pexels.

Nowadays, most people understand that depression is a very real condition. So if you are suffering from the illness, you no longer have to feel lost and confused. Many steps can be taken to help you get better. The first of which is to equip yourself with the necessary information.

There’s no escaping the fact that there’s a long road ahead. However, the five tips below will go a long way to aiding your cause. Embrace them immediately, and your fight against the condition will suddenly look a lot brighter. Right now, that’s all you could ever ask for.

*Deal with other matters that could be adding to your negative feelings. There’s nothing worse than feeling restricted in your body, so combating sports injuries and similar issues is key. Meanwhile, investing in your physical health and body image is sure to increase your feelings of self-confidence too. These jobs won’t suddenly overcome the feelings of depression, but that positivity will offer a great starting point. Even if it’s simply getting a better night’s sleep.

*Stop feeling alone. You wouldn’t face a physical illness alone, and you shouldn’t fall into this trap when hit with depression either. Simply talking to friends and family can take a huge weight off of your shoulders. They will be there to support you throughout the long journey ahead, and their advice could be key. More importantly, you’ll no longer have the uncomfortable feeling of keeping the issue bottled up. Another option is to join a group of fellow sufferers as their emotional support can make all the difference.

Help a friend or relative suffering in silence

Getting professional help for depression. Photo via Flickr.

*Seek professional help. Sessions with mental health experts can help unlock the source of your problems, which can then be used to find the best form of treatment. Meanwhile, using TMS for depression is an increasingly popular option that could lead to remission or reduced impacts. Either way, this is the only solution that will enable you to get the best and fastest response.

*Embrace routines that will promote the positives and downplay the negatives. Each day, write down one thing that makes you feel grateful along with one concern. Keep the good notes in a jar or keepsake box while ripping up the bad one. It’s a simple gesture, but it can make you feel a lot better. Combine this with similar ideas to promote a healthy mindset, and the results will show in next to no time.

*Check that the steps you have taken aren’t having a negative impact. Depression is a complex issue and can take many forms. Therefore, not all supplements and pills will be right for you. Getting the right prescription is vital. You can remove some of the financial strains with a discount card, which can also reduce the threat of increased depression.   

Depression is a serious condition but, with the right treatments, you can get better. Give yourself the best chance with each of those steps above, and you will not regret it.

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59 thoughts on “Defeating Depression

  1. Pingback: Defeating Depression – The Militant Negro™

  2. Hi Christy…
    Another out of the park article and yes there is help. Sometimes the greatest help comes from loved ones and or people who care about your well being. It is far easier for others to see the gradual ro progressive change in behaviour patterns. It certainly is not a battle one has to fight alone. You have given some great suggestions… as alway great factual writing.

    Hugs from Alberta

  3. Pingback: Defeating depression- Reblog – Shereena Badu

  4. Christy this was the most amazing post. I am convinced that it will help people and even more importantly give them hope that they can come out the other end. So proud of you xxxx

  5. Good post, Christy. Depression can be treated. From the outside looking in, it can be hard to understand but as your tips suggest, help is available.

  6. One of the most helpful books I’ve ever read was titled The Depression Cure. It disheartens me how quickly most therapists want to prescribe meds, when that should mostly only be done with sever cases. Lifestyle modifications can go a long way.

    • Medication only goes surface level but doesn’t get to the underlying cause. It’s so much easier to prescribe meds though, right.. Thanks for the book suggestion, Jeri xx

  7. Although all of that in theory is great advice, in practise it is not so straight forward. I have suffered quite a bit with depression this year, and although part of me does reach out to friends another part of me is hesitant to do so for fear of bringing them down or actually losing their friendship because they can’t tolerate someone who feels down at the slightest thing for seemingly no reason. Overcoming depression is a very gradual thing, with ups and downs along the way… it is difficult to imagine a “sudden feeling” of things being a lot better or brighter :-/

    • Oh indeed. As I am a depression sufferer I know all too well about avoiding contact.. but I do recognize when I am doing this.. it really is a consciousness to resist what I find most comfortable, which is being alone, to instead reach out to someone.. and pre-planning for how to react to triggers is big when I’m anxious. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Andrea xx

    • Completely agree, I’ve been diagnosed with depression and I haven’t anyone close to me , just my doctor and counsellor know. I find it easier than dealing with guilt infecting my love ones with this disgusting illness .

  8. Together with what you have already said, I have found this has helped those I have known:-

    Belief is powerful, but so is disbelief. A depressed mind is excessively pessimistic. Stop believing what it tells you as an act of defiance. Do the thing that you thought you would not enjoy. Occasionally you will be surprised and find it helps and is a foundation for more progress. Add to this, clearing away some of the burdens is an advance.

    It is just the initial effort that is difficult, but then discovering the power of disbelief starts to have its effect. 🙂

  9. Good advice, Christy! Even people who aren’t ill with depression, can suffer momentary bouts in life’s up and down landscape. In a microcosmic way, all this applies!

    • Thanks for reminding us it’s okay to have our lows.. I know at my worst low I was so tired of people telling me to “cheer up”! Hope you’re ready for a nice weekend xx

  10. Pingback: Don’t Let Insomnia into Your Life | When Women Inspire

  11. Thank you for this post. The most effective treatment for me is also the one I struggle the most to ask for: validation and support from family and friends. I hate feeling like a burden… But I am working on this mentality and things are slowly improving! 🙂

    • Yes, being a burden is something many of us with depression feel.. I like that your comment ended with a smile 🙂 I hope you keep reaching out to those around you and thank you for the comment!

  12. Wonderful post. It is kinda like the one I just posted today about depression. So many people have depression but are clueless on how to help themselves. Sometimes it takes people who have been through it talking to them that they aren’t alone at all. Love it. ❤ 🙂

  13. Pingback: TMS for Depression | Site Title

  14. when being depressed is very difficult to actually take care of ourselves, we don’t have the energy to it. also, we prefer to keep our distance. people that don’t ever faced depression doesn’t know how it feels, and their advice doesn’t help much.

    i do think that exercising is a great way because it infuses us with positive chemicals, while removing the negative ones.

    i also find it helpful to write about all our dark thoughts and feelings. to know we aren’t a failure or we are wrong for feeling this way. and to not think about it as a disease or a problem we need to fix.

    i’m not telling we should treat it as our “normal” state of being, but to look at it as a natural part of our life’s cycle.

    i now look at it as a dead flower that it’s putting its seeds delicately on the soil. those seeds will be in the dark for as many time it needs to feel comfortable enough to get out. the amount of nurturing it needs will vary from seed to seed. but once it does want to leave the dark place of the soil and feel the light, and the wind, and the rain as well, it will rebirth. and it will be even more beautiful.

    also, having someone to guide us when we feel lost does wonders. and may bring that confidence we need to come out.

    thank you for bringing some light into this mental state. ❤

  15. My webcomic is about my late husband (www.adeafinthefamily.com) told from his point of view/his memoirs. He was deaf and going blind. I still can’t imagine having to deal with that. I felt his depression was completely justified. He struggled with it a lot. My depression, however, felt unimportant in comparison. I still have bouts of depression, but can usually pull myself out by doing what my late husband called “making.” Being creative, making things, etc. I give almost all of my creations away.

    • I am going to check out the webcomic as it sounds like you are bringing awareness through creativity.. and that is powerful.. Thank you for sharing your story xx

  16. It’s my goal this year to be more honest about how I am really feeling, what I really did with my day. If the answer is ” I wept on the floor, shit my guts out and watched four seasons of Buffy the Vampire slayer” that’s what I am going to say. It’s something like 23 percent of Americans every year suffer from mental health issues and it’s so damn hush-hush that it just makes it worse. We are “Team Depression”, “Team Anxiety” and we are all connected in a raw and powerful way, no one should feel alone

    https://damngirlgetyourshittogether.com/

  17. Christy this truly is an admiral post..we both share a commom thought on this topic.
    P.S- I would like you to read my blog on depression too and would really like to know what you think

  18. Thank you. I wouldn’t go so far as to say I am suffering from depression but i have been really low for unknown reasons and its a terrible feeling i have and thats one of the main reasons i have started reading and also sometime writing blogs from today and your post gave me some level of understanding as to what is to be done.

  19. Thank you for this ! The tips I found are good ones on what I would call my “depression journey”. One that I think I would add to this would be – embrace it. Acknowledge you have it and understand that it’s there. I found that when I tried to tuck it away – the depression got worse. When I first got diagnosed I was terrified that depression would be with me forever. Now I accept that it very well might be and thats ok. I may have to battle more but its definitely made me a stronger person!

    I’ll be writing a lot about this is in the future – feel free to check out my new website (excuse the appearance as its very new). I would really appreciate any of your feedback as I really enjoy your writing!

  20. I enjoyed reading your blog. Aspecially “*Embrace routines that will promote the positives and downplay the negatives. Each day, write down one thing that makes you feel grateful along with one concern.” Im in the process of learning how important it is to add a routine into each day. Along with adding graditude into my day and I’m a happy camper. 🙂 One thing not discussed was adding three acts of kindness into each day with your list of three things your thankful for. I enjoyed reading your blog. I look forward to reading more.

  21. I got of my most devastating depression by using photography. Looking at all the beauty in the world. And it’s a great help I recommend to everyone. You don’t have to be a good photographer just seek beauty and life don’t get so dark.. but everything is work. Great post! 😊

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