See the Need, Not the Cause

A lot of people love the idea of being able to devote a huge portion of their time to charity. But, unfortunately, the modern world usually prevents this. Most people can’t afford to abandon their jobs and seek something more meaningful. Instead, they are stuck in a trap with no way to get out and do some good in the world. But, of course, if the passion is there; then you’re probably willing to go to extreme lengths to achieve this humble goal. And, with this drive, there are ways to succeed as a truly charitable human; without compromising on your own life. To help you out, this post will be going through three jobs which allow you to do some good while earning some money.

Street fundraiser, anyone?

Looking to do some good in the city. Street fundraisers can be very rewarding. Photo via Pexels, CC0 License.

Street fundraisers don’t get a lot of good press, unfortunately. People have all sorts of names for those doing this sort of job. And, this is a shame; the job itself can be incredibly rewarding. If you can ignore the stereotypes and happily work like this; you can make loads of money. And, in the process, you’ll be directly improving the funding of a charity. A lot of very large charities embark on this sort of endeavour. Charities like the UK’s Shelter and Cancer Research UK do this sort of work. The job itself will be fairly flexible with hours. But, you will have to meet some targets. This job requires someone with good social skills and the drive to sell a product which doesn’t benefit the buyer.

Caregiving for seniors as a job option

Caregiving as a career provides a meaningful way to help those in need. Photo via Pexels, CC0 License.

Caregiving is a better option for some. This sort of work won’t directly impact a charity. But, you will make lives of loads of people better. Schemes devoted to facilitating seniors helping seniors have popped up everywhere. These sorts of companies hire anyone, regardless of age. And, they allow you to earn a living while helping seniors to live their lives independently. This sort of job isn’t as flexible as charity fundraising roles. But, it will probably be an easier job. It is well suited to people who like to get hands-on with their support. For those with a sensitive constitution; this role may not be the best. But, it can be incredibly rewarding for those that take part.

Get into a life of charity

Right in the thick of the charity. Photo via Pexels (CC0 License).

The last option on this list is the most like normal work there is. In fact, it is just a normal job; but, you will be aiming to do it for a charity. Most charities require employees to do admin work or other technical roles. This sort of job will put you right in the thick of the charity. And, it gives you the chance to do work that you love; instead of just doing charity work or fundraising. This sort of job is best for those who don’t mind the nine to five; but, want to do more than they do in their normal job.

Hopefully, this will inspire you to have a bit of a change of pace in your life. All of these options can progress into a good career; if you put the work in. So, this could be your chance to get into a life of charity, without having to do any of it for free.

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18 thoughts on “See the Need, Not the Cause

    • Yes, sometimes when things seem too much for us we step away and don’t do anything so I’m hoping that by bringing down the scenario to more realistic points, there will be more action 🙂 Thank you

  1. It seems many charities are really just businesses, who executives make 7 figure incomes. There product is making you think you are doing something good and 10 or 15 cents on the dollar actually goes to the purpose of the charity. Of course not all are like this, but many of the large well known ones fall into this category.

    • Certainly there are a broad range of “goals” for businesses, as with individuals, and some take a different path than others.. I hear what you are saying. I think I’m a “realistic optimist” 😉

  2. As a former program director for a community-based charitable non-profit, I helped create several opportunities for those wishing to give back and/or help others. Busy professionals could work from home at times convenient for them to create newsletters and flyers; some made simple tutorials for our computer basics training or donated books to the center library. There was even a guy who designed a professional logo for the summer youth program, then tagged one of his buddies to secure funding for t-shirts. (And he did!)

    During the annual capital campaign it was people like I mentioned above who were the best avenue to new donors by sharing their first-hand knowledge of the organization with family, friends, and co-workers. 😉

    • Such a motivating comment, Felicia! Thanks for sharing your experience 🙂 OH and YES I’m sure I will love reading your book (in response to the comment on your site) ~Hugs

  3. Good ideas! Might work for some retirees too. And one can always find a way to help family members and give in whatever way you can in time or money or even that smile or kind word of encouragement.

  4. Lovely post, Christy. I felt most fulfilled in my job when I worked for Amnesty International and Friends of the Earth. Less money than being a nurse, but far more rewarding ♥

  5. Hi Christy:
    There are great rewards to reaching out into society where you see a need. One of the many aspects of doing so in a Pastoral role is with seniors. They are the people who created the benefits of life we take for granted today.
    It takes time and genuine compassion to gain trust but the end result is getting to hear their story of hardship, trials and the best of all is success.

    Hugs

    • Firstly, thank you for making time for all of the reads today, Rolly. Please don’t feel compelled to comment on all as I know you’re busy. I appreciate it though! Keep reaching out to others as you personify a helpful attitude and giving selflessly! Hugs

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