Women in the automotive industry: Then and now

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Women automotive industry

This post is also available in: French

Everyone knows that times are changing. Changing for the better in many ways, but when we look at women in automotive careers, we can’t help but notice that the running ratio is 10:2 males to females. That is a staggering gender imbalance. Which is surprising considering that 65% of all new cars are bought by ladies. So, why aren’t more women in the automotive industry?

Women in automotive careers and traditional gender roles

This whole stigma that cars are a man’s thing needs to be changed. The idea needs to be stopped. Even if it is done one small step at a time. Sure, there has been this long-standing bias that the motor industry is a male-only job, which is probably why it’s a struggle to attract women to take on one of these roles. But wouldn’t it be great if one day a woman could turn up to this job and not have to worry about her gender being the inevitable point of focus?

History of females in the motor industry

The role of women in the automotive industry isn’t always spoken about but there are important contributions. In 1902, for example, Mary Anderson invented the first-ever windscreen wiper.

Moving on from that, Florence Lawrence is credited with inventing the first turn indicator and the full-stop signal that comes on when applying the foot brake. It doesn’t just stop there; in 1917, Alice Burke drove 10,700 miles across America. Not only to spread the message of women’s political rights, but to also show women’s equality behind a wheel.

At least times have moved on from the 1900s since in 1910 only 5% of licensed drivers were women! Now we can say that women are just as likely to own a car as men in Western society. They also have a massive influence on the car-buying decisions of a family.

Women in the automotive industry today

But that still doesn’t answer why we don’t see more women working in a garage and actually fixing a car… Sure, they may be sat behind a desk in a garage, but most of the time that’s to give people paperwork. Let’s not forget that women can become a mechanic too. Just look at Queen Elizabeth who donned a pair of coveralls and became a truck mechanic and a military truck driver.

Just Google an image of her fixing a car. And yet even though you have a person like the Queen managing to get into the motor industry, you still don’t see many women nowadays fixing up cars as their careers.

Of course, there’s nothing wrong with women not having an interest in it, if they don’t want to fix up a car then fine. But what about the women who do want to become a part of the motor industry? Let’s talk more about women in the automotive industry.

Why ladies should be driving the change

When it comes to women in automotive careers, nothing will get done if it’s just pushed to one side. You don’t have to boycott all-male garages, because obviously, they are just doing their job. It shouldn’t matter if your mechanic is male or female.

With that said, if women wanted to start up their own motor business, then do so. They have to do is find the right premises, hire the right people and make sure they get motor trade insurance. It’s that straightforward and the main thing is to provide expert work and good value for the services done at your garage.

So, is this really an issue? Or, do more women need to stand up and say actually I want to become a part of a predominantly male career choice? Already, times are changing for other things and now it’s time for the auto industry to stop enforcing traditional gender roles. Fathers are staying at home to look after their children while mom goes out to work. All of this is for the better. It’s part of shattering the glass ceiling.

Takeaway on women in the automotive industry

Perhaps things are already changing, and this was just a random article that will soon be forgotten about? All that matters is that if things change for the better. As an ambitious woman, you can do anything you put your mind to, including overcoming male-dominated sectors. Let’s throw the mindset that women weren’t born to be leaders out the window – Perhaps going into the motor industry is one way that women can narrow the gender gap.

This post is also available in: French