D.G. Kaye on the Power of Memoir Writing

Today I am proud to showcase memoir writer D.G. Kaye, who discusses the use of memoir writing as a vehicle for healing the self. I will give her the floor here as her guest post below such a high-quality one! Take it away, D.G.

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Photo of Author D.G. Kaye

D.G. Kaye, Memoir Writer. Photo: Courtesy of D.G. Kaye

I was delighted when you opened up this blog because the issues you present here are all so relatable to other women; a place where we can come and read inspiring stories about women who have accomplished so much in various aspects of life.

I personally enjoy reading stories of people’s personal victories, of overcoming adversity, and growing from unhealthy situations. I am happy to see that in this time of the world, more and more women are recognizing, confronting and speaking out about injustices they have endured.

I’m a memoir writer. My first book Conflicted Hearts is a collaboration of years of journaling memories. My struggles stemmed from growing up as an emotionally neglected child with a narcissistic mother, learning to find my place in the world, while striving to deal with the emotional baggage that followed me.

Unfortunately, abuse is a common issue that too many women endure. We don’t have to have been raped or beaten to have suffered abuse. Abuse lives under the guise of many forms. Emotional neglect is a common form of abuse. Sadly, many women have lived with abuse for so long that they may not be able to recognize that they are being abused because it becomes so familiar. Others may recognize it and fear running away from it because of a myriad of reasons such as being financially dependent on the abuser or perhaps even having a fear of what lies ahead for them if they attempt to leave.

Emotional and verbal abuse is a common practice many women suffer and endure at some point in their lives. The residual damages are devastating to our psyches and self-esteem, and have the propensity to stay with us our whole lives. Low self-esteem cripples our ability to function properly. We tend to develop inferiority complexes, anxieties, and feelings of inadequacy down the road. Our inner damage also plays a part in how we choose our relationships and influences us with the choices of people we allow into our lives.

I’m a nonfiction memoir writer. I wrote three books on different topics: Conflicted Hearts – mother guilt and finding my place in life, Meno-What? – overcoming the dragons of menopause, and Words We Carry – how our self-esteems are molded from the things that happen to us when we are young. If you read all three of my books, you would find a common thread. Although my books are all on different subjects, you can detect my insecurities within them which I’ve battled most of my life.

Healing in Words We Carry

Author D.G. Kaye’s book Words We Carry, a powerful memoir about healing.

In my newest book, Words We Carry, I dissected my own insecurities and delved into my past, seeking what had prompted my own low self-esteem. Childhood teasing and ridicule have a great impact on how we begin to see ourselves, and aid in the choices we make in life such as our appearance and the relationships we tend to gravitate to.

In my books, I talk about all of these issues by exposing my own situations I encountered and sharing the methods I used to triumph over my own shortcomings, hoping to leave positive messages for those readers who struggle with their own identity issues.

Talking to others about our insecurities empowers and inspires us to help ourselves. It helps to know we are not alone with our inner struggles. By learning about positive outcomes from others, it reinforces our beliefs that there is always hope for us to triumph over our self-doubts. It’s all about women helping women.

Realizing our own self-worth can be difficult for many who have been taunted and ridiculed in their younger lives because those words are instilled in us. In order to rise above self-criticizing, we need to weed out the negative forces in our lives and learn to love our own unique selves.

Below are some quotes of kindness and inspiration:

“Failures are finger posts on the road to achievement.”  C.S. Lewis

“There is no education like adversity.”  Benjamin Disraeli

“Always be kind, for everyone is fighting a hard battle.”  Plato

“For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”  D.G. Kaye

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Words We Carry is now available in paperback with her others books on Amazon

You can find D.G. on:   Twitter Facebook Google Linkedin Goodreads

You can also check out her author page.

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43 thoughts on “D.G. Kaye on the Power of Memoir Writing

  1. Wow! To be able to stand up to any type of abuse requires a tremendous amount of inner strength, but to be able to write so eloquently about it and share it with the world is evidence of a powerful soul. Of course, I am going to have to read these books.

    • Thanks so much Macjam for your applause. I write from my own experiences and share my own personal struggles in the hopes that I can inspire others by taking something from my words. 🙂

  2. A great guest post, Christy! …
    D.G is right when she says that abuse lives under the guise of many forms and that emotional neglect is a common form of abuse. I like the message she spreads regarding realizing our own self-worth.
    She is a great writer and I wish you the best with her memoir books.
    Aquileana 🙂

  3. D.G. Kaye’s story is truly inspiring. And I like her quote: “For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?”
    Great guest post, Christy. Thank you.

  4. Thank you so much Christy for inviting me to your blog. I am all about inspiration and overcoming and what better place to be than here at your page to share my thoughts and hopefully inspire others. I thank everyone here for their kind comments. 🙂

  5. D.G. and Christy, great post! D.G., you know you and I came through similar experiences and our beliefs on the power of writing memoir are the same. Christy, good choice for a guest to post on your blog!

    • Hi Sherrey, lovely to find your comment here. Yes, we do seem to come from similar situations, perhaps that is how the universe connected us? Thank you so much for commenting and reblogging. 🙂

  6. Another laudable effort from you christy. kaye is obviously a wonderful writer going by her existing portfolio and her stories are bound to have an uplifting impact on troubled souls…best wishes to kaye….raj

  7. Christy, having D.G. Kaye guesting on your blog is fabulous. What an insightful and thoughtful person D.G. Kaye is. I relate to many things said in this post!

  8. Pingback: Update, moving, blogging, writing, book sale, amazon, interviews, D.G. Kaye

  9. When you go through a chapter and reach out to others to shine light…then that light lifts all. Way to go D.G. and thank you Christy for sharing. ❤

  10. Pingback: Memoir interview, whenwomeninspire.com, writing in memoir, emotional abuse, D.G.Kaye

  11. Lovely sentiments – “It helps to know we are not alone with our inner struggles.” And quotes too – I like yours, Debby: “For every kindness, there should be kindness in return. Wouldn’t that just make the world right?” D.G. Kaye You are painting the picture of a world in perfect balance. Love this!

  12. Thanks for this one, Debby and Christi. Seems so essential to approach our writing with a desire to help others get through the roadblocks of life. “By learning about positive outcomes from others, it reinforces our beliefs that there is always hope for us to triumph over our self-doubts. It’s all about women helping women.” Yes, yes, yes.

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