Nellie McClung: Assessing Her Impact on Women’s Rights (Post 3 of 3)

 

Colorful Canadian Mural about Votes for Women

Mural on Dr. Emily Stowe Way (formerly Elizabeth Street) in Toronto. Photo © Resa McConaghy – Artist: Jacqueline Comrie Garrido.

Welcome to the final installment of Nellie McClung week! This post is written by both Resa and I. As Resa explained in her wonderful post two days ago, Nellie was pivotal in Manitoba being the first Canadian province to grant women the right to vote. The momentous date was January 28, 1916. After this important day, Nellie continued to fight for women’s right to vote in other provinces.

When Were Women Granted the Right to Vote in Other Canadian Provinces?

On March 14, 1916, just two months after Manitoba amended its legislation, women in Saskatchewan gained the legal right to vote. One month later (April 19), Alberta followed suit. The following year, on April 5, 1917, British Columbia changed its laws about women’s right to vote. Just one week later, on April 12, Ontario did the same.

The next province in which women gained the right to vote was Nova Scotia; the momentous day was April 26, 1918. Almost exactly one year later (April 17, 1919), New Brunswick amended its election act to include women. One month passed (May 20) before Yukon made the same change to its electoral legislation.

It was on May 3, 1922, that women residing on Prince Edward Island gained the legal ability to vote. Newfoundland and Labrador followed soon after on April 3, 1925. Women in Quebec and the Northwest Territories had to wait longer; Quebec granted women the right to vote on April 25, 1940, and it was a decade later on June 12, 1951, that Northwest Territories became the last province to make the change.

Nellie in the Alberta Legislature

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Spotlight on Women’s Rights Activist Malala Yousafzai

Activist Malala Yousafzai. Original Photo Source: AK Rockefeller, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Flickr

Malala Yousafzai first came to public attention in 2009 when she wrote a BBC diary about life in Swat Valley in Northwest Pakistan, where the local Taliban had banned girls from attending school. Her diary chronicled her desire to remain in education and for girls to have the chance to be educated.

She wrote it under a pseudonym, Gul Makai, the name of a heroine from a Pashtun folk tale. Three years later, in 2012, she was shot in the head and neck due to this, after her school bus was boarded by a member of the Taliban. Her recovery process began in Pakistan and continued in England, where she now lives with her family. Today, Malala is 17 years old.

Malala Yousafzai: Awards and Achievements

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#GreenWhiteViolet A Guest Post on Women’s Right to Vote

Today I am pleased to announce a guest post on women’s right to vote, written by my blogging friend and costume designer Resa. I hope you enjoy reading the post as much I have!

★★★

#GreenWhiteViolet

100 years ago, #GreenWhiteViolet meant, “Give Women the Vote.” Yet, what does it mean now, and why do I care?

The largely male-dominated world is a mess. To make it work better, I believe that the pragmatic answer is found by commingling the nurturing intuitional intelligence of women equally with the aggressive hard-line intelligence of men.

Nonetheless, women were and are currently sidelined to varying degrees, depending on the situation and issue.

I believe Canadian women have the earned right, and should be at the forefront of peaceful dialogue for a decent global future. This is because our sociopolitical evolution has been exemplary.

In the early 1900’s, women of the United Kingdom, France and the United States of America who were involved in a political movement to obtain their right to vote became known as “Suffragettes.”

Political cartoon of women

Suffragette Political Cartoon – Harper’s Bazaar – illustrates the costume, the movement and the fact that it is a cartoon serves to reinforce the humor aspect that Canadian Women used.

Canadian women were part of the Suffrage movement. Of the many inspiring sisters before us, my favorites are Dr. Emily Howard Stowe, Dr. Augusta Stowe Gullen and Nellie McClung.

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