A Popular New Year’s Resolution From a New Perspective

As we head into 2017, I think it’s important to discuss New Year’s resolutions, as many people make them. They are typically areas where people think they can make improvements in their lives. One of the most common resolutions is to lose weight. Rather than focusing on this goal, though, let’s be thankful for, well, being able to have ample food to eat. Here’s what I mean.

Popularity of the Resolution to Lose Weight

Making Improvements: Is Shedding Weight the Goal?

Weight Loss is a Popular New Year’s Resolution.

The end of the year is not just a time for going to parties and enjoying time with family and friends. It is also when many folks reflect on what they have done during the year and what to modify in the New Year.

According to the data collected by the University of Scranton and Journal of Clinical Psychology, which was shared on Statistic Brain,  the top resolution for 2016 was to shed excess pounds. I am almost certain that the same resolution will be near the top of the list of changes to make for 2017 for a lot of people.

Rather than resolve to do so, though, I encourage you to look instead at this popular New Year’s 2017 resolution in a new way.

Turning the Weight Loss Resolution on its Head

Instead of focusing on taking off weight, why not instead be thankful for to have enough food to eat each day? Think of the people who are starving, not just in third-world countries but also in the same city or town where you live right now.

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Are Women Putting Extra Pressure on Themselves at the Holidays?

A woman feels broken by pressure at the holidays

She is stressed at the holidays. Photo via Pixabay, CC0 Public Domain

In the majority of cases, I think the answer to this headline is “yes.” As a woman, I often try to live up to societal expectations of me at the holidays. Let me give you a personal example from this year and then look at some of the articles I found online that show some disturbing stats.

Speaking From Personal Experience

I have already been to several holiday parties this season. I even co-hosted a Christmas dinner. Each time I went to a party, I bought a gift for the host. Not just any gift. I searched for the “perfect” presents, which in hindsight makes no sense as there’s nothing perfect in the world. Not only that but what’s wrong with giving something that’s not perfect? What’s the worst thing that could happen?

While thinking about this notion I realized, well, I was never asked to bring a gift to any party. In fact, one of my friends said just showing up was gift enough. I bought a present, regardless. I took it all upon myself. Oh, the pressure. I felt stressed. I lost sleep thinking about what to get as the present. All for what was supposed to be a fun Christmas party.

And don’t even get me started on figuring out what to wear to each party. Would a dress, a skirt, or a nice pair of pants be appropriate? But then what about the hair? And I would have to wear makeup, of course. Again, today, I ponder about all of this.

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Nellie McClung: Assessing Her Impact on Women’s Rights (Post 3 of 3)

 

Colorful Canadian Mural about Votes for Women

Mural on Dr. Emily Stowe Way (formerly Elizabeth Street) in Toronto. Photo © Resa McConaghy – Artist: Jacqueline Comrie Garrido.

Welcome to the final installment of Nellie McClung week! This post is written by both Resa and I. As Resa explained in her wonderful post two days ago, Nellie was pivotal in Manitoba being the first Canadian province to grant women the right to vote. The momentous date was January 28, 1916. After this important day, Nellie continued to fight for women’s right to vote in other provinces.

When Were Women Granted the Right to Vote in Other Canadian Provinces?

On March 14, 1916, just two months after Manitoba amended its legislation, women in Saskatchewan gained the legal right to vote. One month later (April 19), Alberta followed suit. The following year, on April 5, 1917, British Columbia changed its laws about women’s right to vote. Just one week later, on April 12, Ontario did the same.

The next province in which women gained the right to vote was Nova Scotia; the momentous day was April 26, 1918. Almost exactly one year later (April 17, 1919), New Brunswick amended its election act to include women. One month passed (May 20) before Yukon made the same change to its electoral legislation.

It was on May 3, 1922, that women residing on Prince Edward Island gained the legal ability to vote. Newfoundland and Labrador followed soon after on April 3, 1925. Women in Quebec and the Northwest Territories had to wait longer; Quebec granted women the right to vote on April 25, 1940, and it was a decade later on June 12, 1951, that Northwest Territories became the last province to make the change.

Nellie in the Alberta Legislature

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