Does Reese Witherspoon Make a Point with #AskHerMore at Oscars?

Reese Witherspoon at the Oscars for #AskHerMore

Reese Witherspoon Steps Up for #AskHerMore

Reese Witherspoon took to the red carpet of the 2015 Oscars to support a social media campaign called #AskHerMore. The feminist campaign, created by the Representation Project, made an impact on the red carpet and beyond, as illustrated below.

What is #AskHerMore?

The campaign #AskHerMore from The Representation Project began last year but got more attention than ever before at the Oscars. After all millions of people are watching the event and famous actress Reese Witherspoon got behind it.

At the Oscars, the campaign took the form of encouraging journalists to ask actresses  questions relating to their films and the amount of work they put into their projects. Reese Witherspoon lent her voice to this campaign. Historically women being interviewed at the big event have been asked by journalists primarily about their outfits and skin care routines. So, this campaign was meant to dive into more about the women’s careers and personalities.

Here is Reese Witherspoon’s Instagram post to show her support for the #AskHerMore movement:

Reese Witherspoon for women #AskHerMore

Reese Witherspoon Post on Instagram about #AskHerMore Goes Viral. Photo via Instagram.

Read the three questions in the above image and realize they are about more than fashion or beauty regimes. The questions are intelligent ones. Yes, this is a feminist movement. After all, men get asked about their work by journalists on the red carpet every year; why aren’t women treated the same way?

Impact of #AskHerMore at the Oscars

Are you wondering if the social media campaign for women had an effect at the Oscars? I would say yes. We can see it in a few moments throughout the night. Let’s start with Witherspoon. Notice that there are 19,000 likes for the above photo so far, just 23 hours after Reese Witherspoon posted it on Instagram. Also, she captioned that Instagram photo above with these words:

“I love the Oscars AND fashion like many of you – and am excited to share #WhoIAmWearing later tonight. (not yet!!!) But I’d also love answer some of these Qs… And hear your suggestions?! (Share em below!) There are so many amazing, talented nominees this year! Let’s hear their stories! Spread the word.”

The next impact of the feminist movement can be seen by Patricia Arquette. When she won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress for the movie Boyhood, she began with the usual thank you’s and then went on to discuss equal rights and wage quality.

As she said, “It’s time to have wage equality once and for all.” She was speaking out on behalf of female equality beyond the Oscar world as women still continue to earn less than men across the globe. Her speech was given strong support by Meryl Streep and Jennifer Lopez, as shown by their cheering at the end of the speech.

See Patricia Arquette’s Oscar speech at the video below. Fast forward to 1:05 to hear her discussion about wage equality. I hope you take the time to watch the brief clip.

What about the Mani-Cam at the Oscars?

As well, did you notice that E!‘s Mani-Cam was nowhere to be seen? The “Mani-Cam” is a camera that focuses on female manicures and their fashion accessories such as bracelets or rings. Normally it sits on a mini stage on the red carpet. It was not used this year.

I totally love that the Mani-Cam was pulled. After all, men aren’t getting their hands scrutinized in any way by a camera lens. What is the point of it? I think it just supports women as being beauty objects and is sexist. It certainly does not support female equality in any way. As well, why focus in on women’s bodies? It’s just setting women up for scrutiny by others who hide behind their keyboards and type out hateful sentences of “she’s showing her age” or similar words. It’s harmful, not helpful, in my opinion.

What do you think, did Reese Witherspoon make a point with #AskHerMore at the Oscars?
 
 
©2015 Christy Birmingham

Advertisements

30 thoughts on “Does Reese Witherspoon Make a Point with #AskHerMore at Oscars?

  1. Three cheers for Reese Witherspoon, Christy. As a journalist in the entertainment field, I always asked folks the same type of questions, men or women, based on the research I did on the project they were working on and their life. I think there are a lot of writers of both genders who operate the same way. The red carpet shows at these awards ceremonies, though … very shallow and beauty based. Yes, ask about the depth of work, most certainly. And while watching the show last night, I cheered Patricia Arquette’s acceptance speech as well. Excellent post here, Christy. Very inspiring.

    • It certainly was a refreshing angle to take on the interviews of the actresses of the red carpet. I hope to see this trend continue where women are valued for their minds primarily. Thank you so much for your wonderful comment, Mark!

  2. The red carpet has always been the “Who and what are you wearing?” carpet. I would much rather here about film projects and other things, and a nod given to the designers and fashions. We have to remember though, this is hollywood……great post as always, Christy 🙂 I give Reese, Patricia and all the women working in the industry great respect, it is a tough business.

      • You’re welcome, Christy. I believe progress is being made, last year was a srong year for women in the film industry. Hopefully there will be a positive trend overall.

  3. Oh I missed the Oscars Awards…. But I have checked out outfits and the red carpet on TV… Anyhow it is interesting that Reese Witherspoon took it all to a different level with this campaign and I guess she is more than a blondie… Which reminds me of her role in the movie Legally Blonde…. I also think that she looked gorgeous in her dress, even better than Jennifer Aniston.
    Great post, Chris…. Happy week … Best wishes to you 😎

    • Yes, Reese Witherspoon has a lot of pull because she’s in the public eye so it’s great that she took part in the campaign, particularly at the Oscars that millions of people watch around the world! Very cool. Thank you Aqui-pie for being here xo

  4. Cheers to Reese for bringing more attention to women than what they wear and how their nails look. 🙂 I love her anyway even though she does make a perfect Barbie 🙂 but I also admire her for the role she played in “Wild.” If celebrities can make an impact in the right direction then they should since their opportunities are plentiful. Wonderful post, Christy! ♥

  5. Well highlighted Christy, thank you. We were having these issues when I worked in a male dominated industry in the eighties, and yet they still rumble on…. ❤

  6. I never watch the O’s, but for some reason we tuned in this year. Yay! Women’s roles can never be emphasized enough. Pay should be equal for men and women in the same jobs. Women have more to offer than being merely sex objects. Women in any occupation should be respected for the job they do, and equal pay and equal treatment are the best way to honor and respect women’s roles in today’s world. Strides have been made. Men can no longer legally disrespect a woman verbally or physically as they once could. Change is slow, but looking back to when I first entered the workforce, we have progressed, but not enough.
    Thanks for posting Christy.

    • Thanks Michelle for your comment that adds to the conversation here. Equal pay between genders really should be a given in the age we’re living in; it’s this amazing age of new technology and yet we’re so behind in gender equality… still.

  7. I admit to not watching the Oscars, but after reading all the after posts I think I should start.

    This post gave me another reason to love Reese Witherspoon. Thanks for posting. Gives me hope that we are moving in the right direction.

  8. Excellent post! I loved that Patricia Arquette spoke out for equal rights. I’m finding more and more, actors are speaking up for just causes. I’m wondering though if the Oscars is the right platform for bringing up some of these issues. And brava Reese, let us share what drives us to succeed rather than ‘who we are wearing’.

  9. Hi Christy,

    Thank you for sharing the post about Reese Witherspoon and her message for journalists to interview woman on their work and not just the clothes and jewelry they wear. Reese is an inspiration because she is focused on producing movies about interesting women characters.

    Another excellent post! Have a great weekend!

    Regards,
    Linnea

  10. Great post Christy! I liked the #AskHerMore campaign from the first I heard about it. I’ve always hated the Mani-Cam! (Notice it begins with Man… “lol”)
    As I work in the biz, i have been very sensitive to aging. It is a very age hating industry, especially for women, even when you work behind the camera.
    At a time when I should be hearing that I am extra valuable for all of my gathered experience, I hear “she’s showing her age”. Sigh!
    Joan Rivers bought big time into the idea that women needed to increase plastic fantastic ideas of beauty & retain/preserve youth. It was the death of her. Double sigh!

    • Ohhh ‘man’-i cam indeed! I didn’t realize that even behind the camera there was that pressure for youth so I appreciate you sharing that insight here, Resa. It really is sad that they years of experience are not appreciated as much because of the aging process – and that’s a gender bias for sure as men are considered to become ‘distinguished’ with age more times than not. I’m sighing with you now!

      • Relinquished, extinguished… forget it!
        Make me distinguished!
        There’s got to be more Audrey way out of here?

        Trying to be poetic, like you.

  11. Pingback: Why was the Film Noir Femme Fatale Popular in the 1940s? | When Women Inspire

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s